Siberian Huskies In Cold Weather

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Siberian Huskies in cold weather

So, with frigid temperatures this past week, I’ve been seeing a lot of posts about bringing your dogs inside.   “If you’re cold, they’re cold.”
While this is true for many breeds, Siberians were built for this weather. …  9 times out of 10, if you’re cold, they’re comfortable & happy.
A Siberian shouldn’t be forced to be inside.  Yes, you should provide indoor housing for them in these temperatures.   But if you let them out to play/go to the bathroom, don’t chase them down to bring them back in.   Your Siberian knows when he/she is cold, and will come inside when they want or need to come inside.

Siberian Huskies in cold weather
Look at this photo I took yesterday of Joker’s coat.   See how much snow is on his coat?    This was after about an hour of playing. It didn’t melt.   Do you know why?
The Siberian has a double coat that is built for this type of weather. Indeed, they can withstand temperatures well below this, up to -76 degrees Fahrenheit. The Siberian’s undercoat helps lock in heat, and keeps it from escaping, which is why the snow on Joker’s coat didn’t melt.  It shows just how little heat is actually escaping his body.  The guard hairs keep the snow out of the undercoat, similar to waterproofing.  Ever wondered why it is so hard to bathe a Sibe and get them truly wet down to the undercoat?
You should always supervise their outdoor time, and if you have a young puppy or older dog, pay closer attention to their time outside in this frigid weather.    But allow your Siberian to be outside and have fun, because this is the weather they LOVE, and this is the weather they are build for.

 

Below are a few photos of Joker, Domino, Moleigh, & Tink playing in the snow. See how happy they are?

Siberian Huskies in cold weather Siberian Huskies in cold weather Siberian Huskies in cold weather

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7 comments
  1. Great post! I knew Siberians could withstand really cold weather, but I had no idea they could survive in temperatures around -76 degrees Fahrenheit. That is amazing!

    • Kiran,

      Siberians are built for snow. You will know if your Siberian is cold or wants to come in. My kennel has large indoor and outdoor runs, separated by a doggy door. Although my Siberians have 24 hour access to come inside, almost all of them choose to spend most of their time outside in the winter, even sleeping outside in the snow.

      A Sibe’s coat is made to hold in heat. Snow can lay on top of the coat without melting because of this. If your dog’s coat is wet, or it is shivering, then it needs to come inside, because the coat isn’t holding the heat well enough. But if you have to chase them down to bring them in, they aren’t cold. lol

  2. I agree with you, my shasta just loves the cold weather. Shasta will burry himself in the snow, its so funny he waits for the kids to walk by and he will come up from umder the snow and scare the dickens out of them.

  3. I have a Siberian husky and she is out most of the time
    , she does have a very good dog house . should I be bring her in
    because I have done that and she is very unhappy and hot when I do that but if I leave her out people around here yell at me for that telling me that I am abusing her.

    • Sherri,

      Do what is best for your dog. Unfortunately, too many people are uneducated and rather stupid when it comes to Siberians in cold weather. As long as your dog’s coat is good, she has adequate shelter, and is warm, there is no reason to force her to be inside. If she is cold, her coat will be wet, she will be shivering, and she will want to come inside and be warm.

      My Siberians are all acclimated to the cold weather. They have 24/7 access to come inside, however they prefer to stay outside, and usually end up sleeping in the snow. They prefer that to being indoors. As long as they are healthy and their coat is protecting them as it should, I do not force my dogs to be inside. They know when they are cold, and they can come inside when they want.

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